The real truth about taking Viagra

viagra
viagra The real truth about taking Viagra

Viagra is now widely recognised around the world as an erection assistant for men. Men use Viagra to help in ‘getting it up’ when they need to perform and taking Viagra has become more commonplace in society to counter stress related erection problems and balance pleasure with work.  In 2014 the American military spent over £63 million pounds on Viagra alone, so that suggests its effectiveness in treating erectile dysfunction.

 

But why shouldn’t you take Viagra?

 

Viagra is a prescription drug used primarily to treat erectile dysfunction. While you can sometimes get it over the counter or order online, you should see always see a qualified doctor before taking Viagra.

 

Viagra works by increasing the blood flow to the penis so that you can get and keep an erection that can be maintained through sexual intercourse. Viagra usually takes up to 30-60 minutes to show effects as the blood flow to the penis is increased. Although Viagra has different results for each individual, it is proven to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction.

 

Viagra has several medications it will interfere with including other erectile dysfunction medicines.  Taking nitrate-based medication is inadvisable as Viagra is known to increase the hypotensive effects of nitrate medications. Similarly, Viagra should not be considered when you are on Pulmonary arterial hypertension medicines.

 

Recreational use of Viagra drugs can result in actually creating a dependency on the pill to gain an erection. This, in turn, will result in causing erectile dysfunction, which may require surgery and implantation to resolve as Viagra use has already been abused.

 

Ultimately, you should not be using Viagra. It is better in the long term to seek alternative non-surgical procedures such as penis enlargement injections or penile implants for a more controlled erection when you need it. Penile implants last significantly longer and have advanced tremendously in recent years, meaning there is little to no risk involved in the procedure.

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